End of the dry fly season

The dry fly season coming to an end. But it’s certainly not over and the fishing can still be quite good. There are still insects on the surface – some that come from below and even some that come from above. An important food item for trout and grayling during the fall is sedges – or caddis.

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Caddis or sedge

Brown Caddis - Stefan Larsson-04

Two words for the same insect – an insect that is quite important to the trout- and grayling fisherman. In fact probably even more important than the mayflies since there are so many more species of caddis than there are mayflies. Like the mayflies they are important both as nymphs, emergers and adults and imitations are plentyful.

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Europea 12

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The Europea 12 is a simple, beautiful dry imitation of a sedge or caddis. Originally it’s a French pattern, attributed to André Ragot – according to the Danish author Preben Torp Jacobsen. I’ve not been able to find out how old the pattern is, but Preben Torb Jacobsen has published it in 1976, so it’s older than that. Something tells me it’s from the 1960s, but that’s nothing but a hunch.

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Imitating a case building caddis larvae

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A typical scenario when fishing for trout, rainbow trout or grayling in winter and early spring is that the water is cold… and there is a lot of it: Not least during periods of rain or meltwater runoffs. In those situations river fish hug the bottom or any structure, that provides shelter from the current. In lakes, they tend to go deep as well, partly because that’s where most of the food is concentrated during winter. Continue reading “Imitating a case building caddis larvae”